A photo illustration show a syringe. Argentina was selected to test a vaccine against COVID-19, it is estimated that the clinical phases will begin in August. Carol Smiljan/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Last week, Pfizer and BioNTech filed for emergency authorization of their coronavirus vaccine with the Food and Drug Administration.

Once a vaccine is authorized, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will go through the information on the vaccine and vote on whether to “recommend the vaccine and, if so, who should receive it.”

Dr. Celine Gounder, a member of Joe Biden’s COVID-19 advisory board, told CNN on Friday that Biden “is leaving it to the public health experts and scientists to figure out how best to allocate the limited supply first.”

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Dr. Celine Gounder, a member of Joe Biden’s COVID-19 advisory board, told CNN on Friday that public health experts and scientists will decide who among the groups that will be prioritized will get it first when a limited supply of vaccine is available.

“That’s where it gets a bit more political and, frankly, this is where the President-elect is leaving it to the public health experts and scientists to figure out how best to allocate the limited supply first,” Gounder told CNN.

Last week, Pfizer and BioNTech filed for emergency authorization of their coronavirus vaccine with the Food and Drug Administration. Pfizer announced that its vaccine had a 95% efficacy rate in its final-stage clinical trials.

Pfizer has applied for emergency authorization and Moderna, which also reported a 95% efficacy rate, is expected to do the same by the end of the month, Business Insider’s Aria Bendix reported.

Once a vaccine is authorized, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will go through the information on the vaccine and vote on whether to “recommend the vaccine and, if so, who should receive it,” according to the committee.

According to the ACIP, healthcare personnel, essential workers, people at high-risk, and senior citizens at the age of 65 or older are the four groups the committee is “possibly” recommending to get the vaccine early if supply is limited.

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Public health experts have suggested a variety of frameworks as to who should get the vaccine first.

According to a report by public health experts at Johns Hopkins University based on data available in August, “Those most essential in sustaining the ongoing COVID-19 response,” “those at greatest risk of severe illness and death, and their caregivers,” and “those most essential to maintaining core societal functions” are the group so individuals recommended for priority access for the vaccine.

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